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Fall Allergies

Oct 31, 2018

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Written by: Elizabeth Dolan, LCPC A staggering report by the American College of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology states that Asthma affects more than 24 million people in the U.S., of which are 6 million children.

Written by: Elizabeth Dolan, LCPC

A staggering report by the American College of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology states that Asthma affects more than 24 million people in the U.S., of which are 6 million children.
Allergies are the 6th leading cause of chronic illness in the U.S. with an annual cost of $18 billion. With more than 50 million Americans suffering from allergies each year, I have thought often about the negative side effects and the possible on-set side effects of depression. There has been many studies out in recent years that proves the correlation between depression and allergy sufferers. Some research has been focused around the symptoms of allergies and their effects on the human brain. As a chronic allergy sufferer myself I can attest to the inability to breathe through my nose, the constant sinus pressure headaches, not sleeping well, and overall eye irritation during peak days of pollen or ragweed. The overall symptoms of allergies can cause what might feel or look like depression. It is important for self-care that we are aware of the symptoms for both and are treated for both separately.

Experts recommend:
- Staying indoors when pollen counts are high.
- Keep windows closed and the air conditioner on.
- Keep humidity in your home below 50% to stop mold growth.
- Replace/Wash curtains frequently, and go with easy-to-clean floor coverings like wood or tile rather than rugs or carpeting.
- Wash bedding frequently in water that’s at least 130 F to kill dust mites.
- Encase mattresses and pillows in allergen-impermeable covers.
- Don’t share your bed with the family pet.